Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets.
FOAM PLATE AIRPLANE

Materials
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets. 1 foam plate
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets. 2 Straws (about 3/16" diameter)

Tools
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets. Ruler
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets. Pencil
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets. Scissors
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets. 1 piece of wood 1 1/2" x 1 5/8" x 7" or a ruler


 
Cub scouts, Boy scouts, after school programs and engineering clubs, have all used our projects to keep young minds interested in their respective programs. Our projects are based on using simple tools and extremely inexpensive materials to create stimulating projects such as hovercrafts, rockets, air cars, airplanes, paddle boats, sail boats, spin copters and water rockets.
Construction
Cut the patern and lay it on the foam plate. Carefully and without bending, mark and cut the pattern from the foam plate. Mark the center at the front and back and draw a centerline on the bottom. If foam is not flat the select the bottom as the side with the belly up at the center. Center the foam on a 1 5/8 inch wide piece of wood as shown in the photo. Bend both rudders against the sides of the wood and hold there while rubbing the hot end of the glue gun on the folds without dispensing any glue. Let the folded rudders cool for a few seconds before releasing. If the 1 5/8 inch piece of wood is not easily available use a ruler to carefully make the bends so both rudders point exactly in the same direction.

Glue a 6 inch long piece of small straw on the bottom centerline starting at 1/2 inch from the back and extend 1 1/2 inches over the front. Cut a 2 inch piece of straw at a 45 degree angle and glue on the bottom of 6 inch straw starting at the front and settling the 45 degree angle toward the back so the angle can be used for rubber band launching.

Make a small cut 1/8 inch long next to each rudder so that the section can be bent up or down to control the airplane in flight. Balance check the airplane by adding low temp glue in and along side to the bottom straw until the ballance point is about 3 inches from the back. Lay the airplane on a pencil to check balance position. Experiment with different balance positions before adding more glue.

The airplane may be launched by throwing or by rubber band. Use a thin (1/16 inch) rubber band and hold it between thumb and finger of the left hand and drape over the thumb nail. Hook the airplane onto the rubber band, stretch and release. Bend the back of the body to make the airplane go up or down. Bend rudder to control left and right turns. Launch straight ahead or by holding the airplane at different bank angles to see what works best.

Make your airplane fly longer and farther!
1. Hold airplane at the center of the tail and look at both wings from the front center. If either wings has any bends or twists not on the other wing bend, warp, or twist either wing until it is exactly the same shape as the other wing.
2. With your eye in the same place look at the rudder(s). Bend or twist until you can only the front and so they both point in the same way.
3. Test fly and reset until the airplane flys without turning or rolling.
4. Test fly to set the elevator. Bend up for more climb and bend down for less climb. If airplane does loops bend down until it looses all its speed at the top of the loop. It should 1/2 roll and give a long glide and long flight times.

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